Monthly Archives: September 2013

Why is Great Marketing Like Sailing?

Illustration of Pond Island, MaineThere is something powerful about a personal recommendation from a trusted source. A trustworthy friend’s “all-time favorite, must-see place to visit” and their “you’ve absolutely got to read this” statements have credibility—much more credibility than paid ads displayed in your Facebook feed recommending the same things. So how can personal recommendations spur better marketing?

A comparison of marketing and sailing can provide some insight.

Why is great marketing a lot like sailing a boat?

Just like a gust of wind, word-of-mouth is a force that occurs naturally in the world. A sail boat requires the power of the wind to move forward. Similarly, a brand can employ people’s innate desire to share great experiences. Brands offering remarkable products can employ the naturally occurring phenomena of people making personal recommendations on the brand’s behalf. Think of it as putting up a sail to capture the wind. This is called Advocacy Marketing.

Brands that offer a remarkable product experience can be propelled forward by the power of Advocacy Marketing. Brands that don’t—they’ll have to do some rowing.

Marketing should be less like rowing.

Today, marketing feels a lot more like rowing a boat. Each movement forward requires the exertion of energy. Marketing departments will spend vast amounts of money on TV commercials, radio ads, Web links and banners, etc. to compete for your attention. None of these methods have the power to influence you like an authentic recommendation from a trusted friend. And all of them require a constant input of energy and capital to sustain.

This analogy became very clear in my mind while recently kayaking in Maine. My destination was to see a historic lighthouse on Pond Island. The experience of rowing to the island was enjoyable, but I remember thinking how the natural forces all around (i.e. the wind, current, and waves) were so much more powerful than my own efforts to propel myself forward with only a paddle. It was a much easier return trip with the wind at my back and current pushing me forward.